Home ♃ Recent Stories ☄ The Morgan Project Launches ‘Courage’ Curriculum in Birmingham Schools

The Morgan Project Launches ‘Courage’ Curriculum in Birmingham Schools

2786
0
The Morgan Project recently announced the launch of its "Conflict and Courage" curriculum in two Birmingham City Schools — Phillips Academy, and A.H. Parker High School. (Provided)

By Sym Posey | The Birmingham Times

After three years of planning, coordination, and commitment, The Morgan Project recently announced the launch of its “Conflict and Courage” curriculum in two Birmingham City Schools — Phillips Academy, and A.H. Parker High School.

The Morgan Project was inspired by the social justice movement of 2020 and founded by members of the Young Men’s Business Club (YMBC). The group, which has roughly 60 members of all genders and ages, is a Birmingham civic organization that meets weekly for the members to learn more about what is happening in their community.

The Morgan Project seeks to introduce evidence-based lessons into classrooms and lead public conversations in meeting spaces to present a fuller picture of the country’s history, with a focus on Alabama.

The mission of The Morgan Project is to teach Civil Rights and social justice through Birmingham’s history of conflict and courage.

The inaugural pilot program kicked off with speakers Charles Morgan III and Lisa McNair engaging with 11th graders with insights and personal stories.

Morgan is the son of Charles Morgan Jr., known for a speech he gave Sept. 16, 1963, the day after the 16th Street church bombing in Birmingham that killed four girls. McNair is the younger sister of Denise McNair, one of the girls killed in the bombing.

The Morgan Project is focused on introducing into the social studies and civics curriculum a true accounting of the conflict and courage that defined the modern-day Civil Rights movement.

“The enthusiasm and passion for learning that we’ve seen from the students have been profound and affirming,” Rachel Gandy, Executive Director of The Morgan Project, said. “Our work is not just about imparting knowledge; it’s about inspiring a new generation to carry forward the torch of justice, equality, and civil rights.”

Gandy said that a student recently shared that they gained a deeper appreciation of the struggles and sacrifices made by Civil Rights activists after listening to one of the presentations and research.

“Such reflections underscore the impact of our mission — to not only educate but to foster empathy and understanding through the lens of our shared history,” Gandy added.

The primary aim of the “Conflict and Courage” curriculum is to introduce and empower educators to confidently deliver this essential content.

“In light of recent legislative efforts that could hinder the progress we’ve made; The Morgan Project stands firm in its convictions. We believe that an honest and comprehensive education in civil rights is essential for creating a society that not only acknowledges its past but learns from it,” Gandy said.

For more information about The Morgan Project and to financially support their educational initiatives, please visit their website. https://www.morganproject.org/